Faiths and the Environment

Faiths and the Environment 2017-10-05T15:22:20+00:00

Welcome to the faiths and the environment section of the REEP website. Introductory text about the major sections/resources in this area… Etiam ornare posuere nunc, ut hendrerit nisl tincidunt at. Nam id mi non sapien commodo ultricies sit amet in arcu. Praesent vestibulum turpis ut urna volutpat lacinia. Suspendisse elementum justo vitae bibendum porta. Etiam quis suscipit massa. In gravida purus neque, id ullamcorper orci efficitur vitae. Cras eu sodales odio. Proin vestibulum risus sed lorem suscipit sodales. Ut sagittis bibendum aliquet. Sed interdum rutrum tellus. Fusce pharetra scelerisque massa nec bibendum. Suspendisse potenti. Aenean non sagittis velit. Etiam sagittis orci mauris, eu dignissim justo sagittis eget. Nulla facilisi. Sed sit amet dui dolor.

Welcome to the faiths and the environment section of the REEP website. Introductory text about the major sections/resources in this area… Etiam ornare posuere nunc, ut hendrerit nisl tincidunt at. Nam id mi non sapien commodo ultricies sit amet in arcu. Praesent vestibulum turpis ut urna volutpat lacinia. Suspendisse elementum justo vitae bibendum porta. Etiam quis suscipit massa. In gravida purus neque, id ullamcorper orci efficitur vitae. Cras eu sodales odio. Proin vestibulum risus sed lorem suscipit sodales. Ut sagittis bibendum aliquet. Sed interdum rutrum tellus. Fusce pharetra scelerisque massa nec bibendum. Suspendisse potenti. Aenean non sagittis velit. Etiam sagittis orci mauris, eu dignissim justo sagittis eget. Nulla facilisi. Sed sit amet dui dolor.

SIKHISM | Bandi Chhorh Divas

19 October Although Diwali (the festival of lights) is widely considered solely to be a Hindu festival, it is actually celebrated by Sikhs too, albeit for different reasons. Sikhs celebrate Diwali as Bandi Chhorh Divas (Prisoner Release Day) in respect of Guru Hargobind Ji’s release from Gwalior Fort prison on this day in 1619 AD. When, after several months of imprisonment, Guru Hargobind ji was granted release he was would not embrace his own fortune and refused to leave the fort until all fifty-two of the other Sikh prisoners were freed. Guru Hargobind Ji was given the name Bandhi Chhorh because the bandi (imprisoned ones) were chhorh (released) by Him. When Guru Hargobind and the other prisoners reached the city of Amritsar, they arrived during Diwali. Overjoyed at seeing their Guru again, the people illuminated Amritsar and Sri Harimandir Sahib (the Golden Temple) with lamps and candles. They sang gurbani kirtan (devotional hymns) in his honour and recited prayers in veneration of his willingness to sacrifice his own freedom for the sake of other innocent lives. Today the tradition lives on in Amritsar. Every year, the Golden Temple is filled with thousands of candles and floating lamps and its domes [...]

By | October 19th, 2017|

SIKHISM | Bandi Chhorh Divas

19 October Although Diwali (the festival of lights) is widely considered solely to be a Hindu festival, it is actually celebrated by Sikhs too, albeit for different reasons. Sikhs celebrate Diwali as Bandi Chhorh Divas (Prisoner Release Day) in respect of Guru Hargobind Ji’s release from Gwalior Fort prison on this day in 1619 AD. When, after several months of imprisonment, Guru Hargobind ji was granted release he was would not embrace his own fortune and refused to leave the fort until all fifty-two of the other Sikh prisoners were freed. Guru Hargobind Ji was given the name Bandhi Chhorh because the bandi (imprisoned ones) were chhorh (released) by Him. When Guru Hargobind and the other prisoners reached the city of Amritsar, they arrived during Diwali. Overjoyed at seeing their Guru again, the people illuminated Amritsar and Sri Harimandir Sahib (the Golden Temple) with lamps and candles. They sang gurbani kirtan (devotional hymns) in his honour and recited prayers in veneration of his willingness to sacrifice his own freedom for the sake of other innocent lives. Today the tradition lives on in Amritsar. Every year, the Golden Temple is filled with thousands of candles and floating lamps and its domes [...]

By | October 19th, 2017|

FAITHS FOR A FUTURE

FAITHS FOR A FUTURE

Click on the the symbols below to explore our Faiths for a Future Resource

Click on the the symbols below to explore our Faiths for a Future Resource
1910, 2017

SIKHISM | Bandi Chhorh Divas

19 October Although Diwali (the festival of lights) is widely considered solely to be a Hindu festival, it is actually celebrated by Sikhs too, albeit for different reasons. Sikhs celebrate Diwali as Bandi Chhorh Divas (Prisoner Release Day) in respect of Guru Hargobind Ji’s release from Gwalior Fort prison on this day in 1619 AD. When, after several months of imprisonment, Guru Hargobind ji was granted release he was would not embrace his own fortune and refused to leave the fort until all fifty-two of the other Sikh prisoners were freed. Guru Hargobind Ji was given the name Bandhi Chhorh [...]

REEP’S THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK…

In the words of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) …

And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count,  it’s the life in your years.

REEP’S THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK…

In the words of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) …

And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count,  it’s the life in your years.